Buy Apple Ipod Classic

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Spice Market iPod Classic (6th Gen) 80 / 160GB Skin
Price:
US $12.99
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Apple iPod classic 160 GB Black (7th Generation) NEWEST MODEL

The new iPod classic comes with 160GB of storage in the same compact size, making it the take-everything-everywhere iPod. It’s available in quintessential silver or striking black. iPod classic also has plenty of battery life (up to 36 hours of audio playback or 6 hours of video playback), good looks (a sleek, anodized aluminum design), and other great features (Cover Flow and Genius playlists for creating perfect playlists). You can even rent a movie from iTunes and watch it on the go.

  • 160 GB capacity for 40,000 songs, 25,000 photos, or 200 hours of video
  • Up to 36 hours of music playback or 6 hours of video playback when fully charged
  • 2.5-inch color LCD with LED backlight and 320 x 240 pixel resolution
  • Supports AAC, Protected AAC, MP3, MP3 VBR, Audible, Apple Lossless, AIFF, and WAV audio formats; H.264 and MPEG-4 video formats; JPEG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PSD (Mac only), and PNG image formats
  • One-year limited warranty with single incident of complimentary telephone technical support

Rating: (out of 149 reviews)

List Price: $ 249.99
Price: Too low to display

Apple iPod classic 160 GB Black (7th Generation) NEWEST MODEL Reviews

Review by Alex:

NOTICE: This review is for the NEW 2009 160GB iPod Classic, NOT the 2007 160GB iPod Classic!

The new 160GB iPod Classic is easily Apple Inc.’s best iPod to date, and out of all of the iPods that I own, this is my favorite.

First, the capacity of this iPod is simply unbeatable. I’ve yet to see another portable media player that can match the iPod Classic in capacity. I have a huge music library, and it’s nice to be able to carry every song that I own on my person at all times. What’s more, thanks to the iPod Classic’s capacity, I also have room to carry a few videos with me, and some of my photos. If you don’t like having to pick which songs to load onto your portable media player, the iPod Classic is the way to go.

The second thing that I love about this iPod can be summed up in two words: it works. The 160GB iPod Classic that was introduced in 2007 was extremely buggy, had a non-responsive Clickwheel on many units, crashed frequently, and required a hit-and-miss firmware update to stop the hard drive from spinning even when the device was “off,” which often lead to dead batteries. All of these problems left the 2007 160GB iPod Classic warming shelves and earning it the infamous “honor” of being the “worst selling iPod ever,” according to Apple. I’m pleased to say that the new 160GB iPod Classic released earlier this month has virtually none of these problems. There’s no “spinning hard drive bug,” the Clickwheel is incredibly responsive, and the device isn’t crash-prone. While it’s true that many of these issues were fixed with last year’s iPod Classic, there hasn’t been a truly functional 160GB model until now. To put it bluntly, this is the iPod that Apple should’ve released in 2007.

Another thing that I really like about this iPod, and the iPod Classic in general, is it’s ability to double as an external hard drive. While I believe that the iPod Nano is also capable of this, the only iPod that really has enough space to function as an external hard drive is the iPod Classic. The hard drive functionality admittedly reduces the number of devices I have to carry on me at any given time. If you regularly work with large files and are considering a new iPod, the iPod Classic is the way to go, plain and simple.

So what are the caveats? Well for starters, as with every other iPod Classic, this is a hard-drive (rather than flash-memory) based device. As a result, it has moving parts which make it unsuitable for running or any physical activity that exerts mechanical shock onto the iPod. Unless you exercise constantly with your iPod though, this really shouldn’t be an issue. The only other caveat, which is more of personal taste than an actual flaw, that I can find, is that Apple has not made any cosmetic changes to this device since they introduced it in 2007. Now don’t get me wrong, the point of an iPod “Classic,” is to retain the “Classic” design, but after seeing how much better a black Clickwheel looks on the silver iPod Nano, I’d have thought that Apple would have given the silver iPod Classic a black Clickwheel as well. However, I admit that this is entirely my personal preference and not a “flaw” per se. I’ve put a quick list of pros and cons together, which can be seen below:

Pros: Largest iPod Capacity-wise, long battery life, “Genius” feature, excellent value for your money, well-built, doubles as an external hard drive, and improvements to Cover Flow.

Cons: Hard Drive (rather than Flash memory) based storage medium; device is cosmetically identical to the 2007 80GB model. (I still don’t understand why Apple hasn’t colored the Clickwheel black on the silver model to match the iPod Nano.)

Finally, I would highly recommend this product, which is why it gets five stars from me. I don’t like the iPod Nano; it’s too small for my hands, and the screen is too small for my eyes. While the iPod Touch may have app store access and Wi-Fi, I find it to be a really gimmicky device, that makes for a poor portable media player, (Apple was wise to position it as a handheld game system,) and is really an “iPhone without a phone.” In contrast, the iPod Classic is an excellent portable media player, it has an excellent interface, and it only costs 9 dollars. To put things in perspective, the 2009 160GB iPod Classic costs dollars more than a 16GB iPod Nano, and 0 dollars less than a 64GB iPod Touch. All in all, I highly recommend this product.

Review by Matthew Mitchell:

I am quite new to the portable mp3 world, although I have about 250 gb of music on my computer. The only mp3 player I own is a 1 gb Samsung Pebble, which I use at the gym. This was the only mp3 player I thought I needed since both of the stereos in my vehicles have mp3 disc players. But then I started thinking…since my new Camry has an auxilary jack to hook up an mp3 device, wouldn’t it be great to have one and get rid of those giant cd wallets?! The first task was to get permission from my wife to spend 250 bucks. After a little hesitation, she agreed. And then it was on to the research. Since I have such a large collection of music, the capacity of the device was number one on my list (as well as positive reviews & quality). I was pleasantly surprised to see that Apple had reissued the Classic in 160 gb form instead of the 120 gb. So after much personal debate between the Zune and the new 160 gb iPod Classic, the iPod won out.

Although the iPod is a fantastic little device with a large capacity, the software is not without its troubles. I downloaded the most current version of iTunes (verison 9) and immediately began importing my mp3 files from my hard drive. This process can take some time, but not much longer than any other media player. I was so excited to finally have the majority of my music all on one device; and have the cover art as well (I just think that is awesome)! After loading a large chunk of my files into iTunes, I noticed that only a handful of the albums had the cover art. I attempted using the “get cover art” function, but it didn’t work. My only option was to track down the cover art online, right click, save, and then add the picture to the album file in iTunes. I know that it’s not such a huge deal, but when you’re dealing with A LOT of music, it can become quite a pain & time consuming. I later learned that the files have to be spelled exactly like they are in iTunes. And if they didn’t come from iTunes in the first place, 9 times out of 10, the album art won’t come up anyway. I would like to see a function that gets the cover art from other online sources, not just iTunes; and without a strict spelling criteria. There’s no reason that the way I name my “The” bands should restrict the retrieval of cover art. An example being “Animals, The” instead of “The Animals.”

So other than the minor annoyance with the cover art, the player itself is fantastic. I found the interface very user-friendly and intuitive, without much of a learning curve. Again, I am new to the world of iPod, but I can honestly say that I am very pleased. I wanted to write a review for people that have a large digital music collection that came mostly from ripping cd’s to their computers. I am one of the people who still enjoy listening to an entire album, and is not satisfied by just downloading the single, so I still buy physical cd’s & collect vinyl. I would definitely recommend the 160 gb iPod to any music fan with a large collection. Just remember to be patient when getting the artwork for all of those older albums. If you don’t have a collection full of Taylor Swift, the Jonas Brothers, or Beyonce, iTunes just may not recognize your music!

Review by Juan Fuentes:

This is the second iPod I own. The first one was a 30 Mb 5th Generation Ipod Video.

First, the plus.

There are many improvements in the 7th generation comparing it to the 5th, although I think most of them were introduced with the 6th Gen. The whole Cover Flow/Genius capabilities are definetly an improvement to the previous software. The games are a nice bonus. I’ve only had it for three days, but I can already see that I like the new interface a lot more.

And the disk space, I mean, WOW! The ipod is basically the same size as my 30 Gb one, but it’s capacity is over 5 times bigger. I am an avid music fan, have tons of music, and my musical taste ranges from ambient to heavy metal, but I think it’s going to be a long time before I fill this one up. I think this is the best feature of this iPod, and by itself, the reason you should buy it.

There are also video capabilities, which have always been a plus, and some other stuff, but I didn’t see a major difference from the previous versions.

But then, why did I give it 4 stars? I wanted 4.5 stars, but Amazon doesn’t let me do that.

Here are the cons.

First, as previous reviewers have stated, the sound quality seems to have downgraded from the 5th Gen iPod. The sound lacks depth, the songs sound more flat. I don’t mean to say that the sound is bad, because it still has a very good sound, and I’ve tested it with headphones, computer speakers and my car stereo. I’m just saying that the 5th Generation iPod sounds better, and the difference is quite noticeable.

The other thing, which might be just my iPod, because I didn’t see other reviewers mentioning it, is that the click wheel seems to be less sensitive/responsive than the 5th Generation one. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it is annoying sometimes that you try so select a song or an option on the menu and the wheel doesn’t respond right away.

There’s also the fact that using Cover Flow seems to make the iPod proccess slower, but then again, loading the covers of literally thousands of records is not a quick task, and you can always not use Cover Flow, so I won’t hold this against the iPod.

To sum it all up. If you have a lot of music and want to carry it all with you; if 30, 60, 80 or 120 Gb is just not enough; if this is your first iPod purchase, or if you just really, really like the new interface and games (I know I did), then I highly reccomend it, and you won’t be dissapointed. To me this is definetly the best music player on the market. You will need to sit down and learn how to use iTunes, but when you do, you’re just going to love this little gadget.

However, if you have a 5th generation iPod that’s working just fine, and you prefer sound quality to disk space, you might not want to buy this one. Just try to be more more picky with the songs you put on it, I guess.

Review by carolinawren:

I love the iPod but this has been a huge disappointment. The hard drive is really noisy when it changes songs, and it did not remember where it was paused in a couple of audiobooks. I assumed this was a defective one and got a new one. Amazon customer service is impeccable!

The second iPod has a less noisy hard drive, but it reset itself for no reason in the middle of a song and then when I tried to re-sync it would not connect to iTunes. Once it finally connected, iTunes says that there is no music on the iPod and that it cannot be synched/recognized. This was after 1 day of use where it was not dropped or mistreated and never left the house. My 5th generation iPod, 3rd generation and shuffle synchronized just fine, so it’s not iTunes or my Mac.

Also, I would say the music quality is not as good as the 5th generation with video. It lacks depth on the new Classic. The size of the device and the hard drive capacity is fantastic and I really like the ability to use the genius function. I even like the slightly odd split screen. I will probably try again with another one, but this is really disappointing. My first bad experience with many years of Apple products.

Buy Apple iPod classic 160 GB Black (7th Generation) NEWEST MODEL now for only Too low to display!

Apple iPod classic 160 GB Silver (7th Generation) NEWEST MODEL

The new iPod classic comes with 160GB of storage in the same compact size, making it the take-everything-everywhere iPod. It’s available in quintessential silver or striking black. iPod classic also has plenty of battery life (up to 36 hours of audio playback or 6 hours of video playback), good looks (a sleek, anodized aluminum design), and other great features (Cover Flow and Genius playlists for creating perfect playlists). You can even rent a movie from iTunes and watch it on the go.

  • 160 GB capacity for 40,000 songs, 25,000 photos, or 200 hours of video
  • Up to 36 hours of music playback or 6 hours of video playback when fully charged
  • 2.5-inch color LCD with LED backlight and 320 x 240 pixel resolution
  • Supports AAC, Protected AAC, MP3, MP3 VBR, Audible, Apple Lossless, AIFF, and WAV audio formats; H.264 and MPEG-4 video formats; JPEG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PSD (Mac only), and PNG image formats
  • One-year limited warranty with single incident of complimentary telephone technical support

Rating: (out of 149 reviews)

List Price: $ 249.99
Price: Too low to display

Apple iPod classic 160 GB Silver (7th Generation) NEWEST MODEL Reviews

Review by Alex:

NOTICE: This review is for the NEW 2009 160GB iPod Classic, NOT the 2007 160GB iPod Classic!

The new 160GB iPod Classic is easily Apple Inc.’s best iPod to date, and out of all of the iPods that I own, this is my favorite.

First, the capacity of this iPod is simply unbeatable. I’ve yet to see another portable media player that can match the iPod Classic in capacity. I have a huge music library, and it’s nice to be able to carry every song that I own on my person at all times. What’s more, thanks to the iPod Classic’s capacity, I also have room to carry a few videos with me, and some of my photos. If you don’t like having to pick which songs to load onto your portable media player, the iPod Classic is the way to go.

The second thing that I love about this iPod can be summed up in two words: it works. The 160GB iPod Classic that was introduced in 2007 was extremely buggy, had a non-responsive Clickwheel on many units, crashed frequently, and required a hit-and-miss firmware update to stop the hard drive from spinning even when the device was “off,” which often lead to dead batteries. All of these problems left the 2007 160GB iPod Classic warming shelves and earning it the infamous “honor” of being the “worst selling iPod ever,” according to Apple. I’m pleased to say that the new 160GB iPod Classic released earlier this month has virtually none of these problems. There’s no “spinning hard drive bug,” the Clickwheel is incredibly responsive, and the device isn’t crash-prone. While it’s true that many of these issues were fixed with last year’s iPod Classic, there hasn’t been a truly functional 160GB model until now. To put it bluntly, this is the iPod that Apple should’ve released in 2007.

Another thing that I really like about this iPod, and the iPod Classic in general, is it’s ability to double as an external hard drive. While I believe that the iPod Nano is also capable of this, the only iPod that really has enough space to function as an external hard drive is the iPod Classic. The hard drive functionality admittedly reduces the number of devices I have to carry on me at any given time. If you regularly work with large files and are considering a new iPod, the iPod Classic is the way to go, plain and simple.

So what are the caveats? Well for starters, as with every other iPod Classic, this is a hard-drive (rather than flash-memory) based device. As a result, it has moving parts which make it unsuitable for running or any physical activity that exerts mechanical shock onto the iPod. Unless you exercise constantly with your iPod though, this really shouldn’t be an issue. The only other caveat, which is more of personal taste than an actual flaw, that I can find, is that Apple has not made any cosmetic changes to this device since they introduced it in 2007. Now don’t get me wrong, the point of an iPod “Classic,” is to retain the “Classic” design, but after seeing how much better a black Clickwheel looks on the silver iPod Nano, I’d have thought that Apple would have given the silver iPod Classic a black Clickwheel as well. However, I admit that this is entirely my personal preference and not a “flaw” per se. I’ve put a quick list of pros and cons together, which can be seen below:

Pros: Largest iPod Capacity-wise, long battery life, “Genius” feature, excellent value for your money, well-built, doubles as an external hard drive, and improvements to Cover Flow.

Cons: Hard Drive (rather than Flash memory) based storage medium; device is cosmetically identical to the 2007 80GB model. (I still don’t understand why Apple hasn’t colored the Clickwheel black on the silver model to match the iPod Nano.)

Finally, I would highly recommend this product, which is why it gets five stars from me. I don’t like the iPod Nano; it’s too small for my hands, and the screen is too small for my eyes. While the iPod Touch may have app store access and Wi-Fi, I find it to be a really gimmicky device, that makes for a poor portable media player, (Apple was wise to position it as a handheld game system,) and is really an “iPhone without a phone.” In contrast, the iPod Classic is an excellent portable media player, it has an excellent interface, and it only costs 9 dollars. To put things in perspective, the 2009 160GB iPod Classic costs dollars more than a 16GB iPod Nano, and 0 dollars less than a 64GB iPod Touch. All in all, I highly recommend this product.

Review by Matthew Mitchell:

I am quite new to the portable mp3 world, although I have about 250 gb of music on my computer. The only mp3 player I own is a 1 gb Samsung Pebble, which I use at the gym. This was the only mp3 player I thought I needed since both of the stereos in my vehicles have mp3 disc players. But then I started thinking…since my new Camry has an auxilary jack to hook up an mp3 device, wouldn’t it be great to have one and get rid of those giant cd wallets?! The first task was to get permission from my wife to spend 250 bucks. After a little hesitation, she agreed. And then it was on to the research. Since I have such a large collection of music, the capacity of the device was number one on my list (as well as positive reviews & quality). I was pleasantly surprised to see that Apple had reissued the Classic in 160 gb form instead of the 120 gb. So after much personal debate between the Zune and the new 160 gb iPod Classic, the iPod won out.

Although the iPod is a fantastic little device with a large capacity, the software is not without its troubles. I downloaded the most current version of iTunes (verison 9) and immediately began importing my mp3 files from my hard drive. This process can take some time, but not much longer than any other media player. I was so excited to finally have the majority of my music all on one device; and have the cover art as well (I just think that is awesome)! After loading a large chunk of my files into iTunes, I noticed that only a handful of the albums had the cover art. I attempted using the “get cover art” function, but it didn’t work. My only option was to track down the cover art online, right click, save, and then add the picture to the album file in iTunes. I know that it’s not such a huge deal, but when you’re dealing with A LOT of music, it can become quite a pain & time consuming. I later learned that the files have to be spelled exactly like they are in iTunes. And if they didn’t come from iTunes in the first place, 9 times out of 10, the album art won’t come up anyway. I would like to see a function that gets the cover art from other online sources, not just iTunes; and without a strict spelling criteria. There’s no reason that the way I name my “The” bands should restrict the retrieval of cover art. An example being “Animals, The” instead of “The Animals.”

So other than the minor annoyance with the cover art, the player itself is fantastic. I found the interface very user-friendly and intuitive, without much of a learning curve. Again, I am new to the world of iPod, but I can honestly say that I am very pleased. I wanted to write a review for people that have a large digital music collection that came mostly from ripping cd’s to their computers. I am one of the people who still enjoy listening to an entire album, and is not satisfied by just downloading the single, so I still buy physical cd’s & collect vinyl. I would definitely recommend the 160 gb iPod to any music fan with a large collection. Just remember to be patient when getting the artwork for all of those older albums. If you don’t have a collection full of Taylor Swift, the Jonas Brothers, or Beyonce, iTunes just may not recognize your music!

Review by Juan Fuentes:

This is the second iPod I own. The first one was a 30 Mb 5th Generation Ipod Video.

First, the plus.

There are many improvements in the 7th generation comparing it to the 5th, although I think most of them were introduced with the 6th Gen. The whole Cover Flow/Genius capabilities are definetly an improvement to the previous software. The games are a nice bonus. I’ve only had it for three days, but I can already see that I like the new interface a lot more.

And the disk space, I mean, WOW! The ipod is basically the same size as my 30 Gb one, but it’s capacity is over 5 times bigger. I am an avid music fan, have tons of music, and my musical taste ranges from ambient to heavy metal, but I think it’s going to be a long time before I fill this one up. I think this is the best feature of this iPod, and by itself, the reason you should buy it.

There are also video capabilities, which have always been a plus, and some other stuff, but I didn’t see a major difference from the previous versions.

But then, why did I give it 4 stars? I wanted 4.5 stars, but Amazon doesn’t let me do that.

Here are the cons.

First, as previous reviewers have stated, the sound quality seems to have downgraded from the 5th Gen iPod. The sound lacks depth, the songs sound more flat. I don’t mean to say that the sound is bad, because it still has a very good sound, and I’ve tested it with headphones, computer speakers and my car stereo. I’m just saying that the 5th Generation iPod sounds better, and the difference is quite noticeable.

The other thing, which might be just my iPod, because I didn’t see other reviewers mentioning it, is that the click wheel seems to be less sensitive/responsive than the 5th Generation one. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it is annoying sometimes that you try so select a song or an option on the menu and the wheel doesn’t respond right away.

There’s also the fact that using Cover Flow seems to make the iPod proccess slower, but then again, loading the covers of literally thousands of records is not a quick task, and you can always not use Cover Flow, so I won’t hold this against the iPod.

To sum it all up. If you have a lot of music and want to carry it all with you; if 30, 60, 80 or 120 Gb is just not enough; if this is your first iPod purchase, or if you just really, really like the new interface and games (I know I did), then I highly reccomend it, and you won’t be dissapointed. To me this is definetly the best music player on the market. You will need to sit down and learn how to use iTunes, but when you do, you’re just going to love this little gadget.

However, if you have a 5th generation iPod that’s working just fine, and you prefer sound quality to disk space, you might not want to buy this one. Just try to be more more picky with the songs you put on it, I guess.

Review by carolinawren:

I love the iPod but this has been a huge disappointment. The hard drive is really noisy when it changes songs, and it did not remember where it was paused in a couple of audiobooks. I assumed this was a defective one and got a new one. Amazon customer service is impeccable!

The second iPod has a less noisy hard drive, but it reset itself for no reason in the middle of a song and then when I tried to re-sync it would not connect to iTunes. Once it finally connected, iTunes says that there is no music on the iPod and that it cannot be synched/recognized. This was after 1 day of use where it was not dropped or mistreated and never left the house. My 5th generation iPod, 3rd generation and shuffle synchronized just fine, so it’s not iTunes or my Mac.

Also, I would say the music quality is not as good as the 5th generation with video. It lacks depth on the new Classic. The size of the device and the hard drive capacity is fantastic and I really like the ability to use the genius function. I even like the slightly odd split screen. I will probably try again with another one, but this is really disappointing. My first bad experience with many years of Apple products.

Buy Apple iPod classic 160 GB Silver (7th Generation) NEWEST MODEL now for only Too low to display!

Apple iPod classic 120 GB Black (6th Generation) [Previous Model]

Now you can take it with you. All of it. Available in a 120 GB model that holds up to 30,000 songs, 150 hours of video, 25,000 photos, or any combination, the new iPod classic fills your pocket with sight and sound. Available in quintessential silver or striking new black, iPod classic catches your eye with its sleek, all-metal enclosure composed of anodized aluminum and polished stainless steel. The new Genius Playlist feature creates an on-the-fly playlist of tracks in your library that go great with the song you’re listening to. And Cover Flow lets you flip through your music

  • 120 GB capacity for 30,000 songs, 25,000 photos, or 150 hours of video
  • Up to 36 hours of music playback or 6 hours of video playback when fully charged
  • 2.5-inch color LCD with LED backlight and 320-by-240-pixel resolution
  • Supported audio formats: AAC, Protected AAC, MP3, MP3 VBR, Audible, Apple Lossless, AIFF, and WAV
  • Supported video formats: H.264, MPEG-4; Supported image file types: JPEG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PSD (Mac only), and PNG

Rating: (out of 548 reviews)

List Price: $ 229.99
Price: $ 220.00

Apple iPod classic 120 GB Black (6th Generation) [Previous Model] Reviews

Review by Stephen Hall:

The updated iPod Classic was probably the least exciting of the new iPods announced in the September 2008 update, but that does not mean it should be dismissed.

I own the 160 GB iPod Classic that has now been discontinued, but there are few differences (perhaps the biggest being the much slimmer shape of this 120 model), and I did get to check this updated 120 GB version out at the store, when picking up the new nano and touch.

Firstly, the 120 GB version is again smaller than the largest capacity available last year, but it is a single platter hard drive, which allows it to maintain the slim shape of the 80 GB version from last year. More storage, a hundred dollars less, and just as small. That is progress despite calls from others that the classic isn’t exciting. It still serves its purpose as the original iPod idea. Big capacity in a simple to use device.

Next, the software has been slightly updated on the iPod Classic. It now includes Genius, like iTunes and the other new iPods. This allows you, when on a song you enjoy, to select the genius feature. The iPod will then compile a list of songs (playlist), which goes together with the original song you were listening to. This helps you rediscover music in your library, with a playlist to fit your mood at the time. I have been using the genius feature for a few days now, and it is impressive the way it compiles these playlists. I was skeptical, but overall, it does a good job. Furthermore, as another review mentioned, the iPod does seem more responsive with this update from what I saw at the store compared to my original 160 GB iPod Classic. Some speculation has been that the older iPod Classics will receive the software update of this new one, but I’m not holding my breath on that.

Overall, the original iPod concept was so good, and that is why the iPod Classic is still a solid choice for a music and media player. It will hold thousands and thousands of songs (up to 30,000 according to Apple at 128 bitrate). I also backup some important files to my iPod Classic, in disk mode, so that I have that additional extra copy of my most vital files. When you have such a large iPod, you can do that. It shouldn’t be forgotten either that while the display of the iPod Classic isn’t as good as the iPod Touch or iPhone, it is still quite good and you can play music videos, TV shows, and movies purchased on the iTunes Store.

Battery life for this new 120 GB model improved over the 80GB model from last year. Apple now estimates it at 36 hours audio and 6 hours video.

I’d recommend the iPod Classic without hesitation, to those who have more than 8 or 16 GBs of music in their iTunes library and want to carry their entire collection. Furthermore, if you have videos and video podcasts you want to always carry with you, again, you can’t beat the storage. I have the lower capacity flash devices as well, but the big hard drive based iPod Classic continues to play an important role in my iPod Collection.

Review by Andrew A. Burnett:

I am a big tech nerd, and although I am a little disappointed that apple will be paying less attention to the classic ipod I bought one, and I really enjoy It!

I previously had a 30GB Video Ipod and It lasted me about 3 years. Its being repaired for a new battery now, but I figured I would upgrade since my library had grown.

Not much has changed to these new ones, except the interface a little. I love genius and I am stoked that it was worked into the functionality. It remains about the same size as my 5th generation? video and so still fits my old rubber case (which is nice).

Probably the best thing about it is, doing a comparison between my roommates 30GB ipod video and this one, I find that the audio quality on this one has improved quite a bit. I don’t know if its the connectors or maybe a d-a converter, but it definitely sounds better. I am a recording engineer so I might be a little more apt to hear it, but its cool.

Overall I am stoked about my new ipod. Its a great device! I will be sad to see apple move on to more of a multi-tool type device, but that doesn’t sway my review on this one. Enjoy!

Review by Barrett Benton:

In a number of circles, the iPod Classic is now considered the “less sexy” iPod. Largely because of the things it appears to lack vis-a-vis the newest “fully-wired” iPods/iPhones: it doesn’t have a phone function (d’oh!), it doesn’t “do” wide-screen for video and games the way an iPhone/iPod Touch does, and…well, it doesn’t seem as much *fun*, darn it! (Memo to the only-two-colors-available fashionistas: silver and [charcoal] black, being *classic* colors, go with everything. When’s the last time you saw a pink Audi or Merc? Mary Kay doesn’t hand either of those out to its top sales stars, which is just as well.) ;-)

Let’s rewind a bit (sorry for the tape-based analogy) to a MacWorld seemingly long, long ago.

At the time, people were clamoring for Apple to include video in their next-generation iPods (they had just announced the iPod Photo, which was the very first iPod I ever owned…sometimes, not being an “early adopter’ can pay off). His Steveness replied, more or less, that people value music a lot more than than they value TV/video stuff, so for the time being, no video iPods. While I happened to agree with Jobs’ sentiments (I rarely watch the box, so there), I also knew how shrewd a businessman he was, and if the Hoi Polloi wanted video in their iPods, by cracky, he’d make ‘em! And while I wouldn’t damn him to Hades for such a pragmatic decision (he’s doing this stuff to make a buck, okay?), the aesthete in me would be put off just a bit. That was then.

NOW: Through a bit of hard work and happenstance, an iPod Classic (120GB) happened to fall into my lap recently (long story). My beloved 60GB iPod Photo wasn’t even half-full, but I welcomed this newest ‘Pod with open arms. The reasons?

- Capacity. Let the deniers who bought their iPhones, Touches, and nanos prattle on; if you’re a serious music lover, you’ve got a ton of music on the home front, and, if you’re Of A Certain Age, probably in more than one format: CD, LP cassette, and, if you’re particularly well-preserved, you might even have a few commercially-produced open-reel tapes lurking about. Paying upwards of 0 or so for the “biggest” iPod Touch might be a bit of a stretch for you…am I right? You might not even give a rat’s tuchus (it’s okay to say that here, right?) about video and gaming capability, but you’ll really care about capacity. Are we grokking here?

Good. Because this iPod, even this late in the game, is aimed toward you and me. Apple, now the 900lb gorilla of the portable digital-media market (how strange that must be to Mssrs Gates & Ballmer) has the market covered: you want a device that’s all-singing, all-dancing? You can get an iPhone, or, short of that, an iPod Touch. If it’s got to be as tiny as possible (I won’t ask why…), there’s the nano, or, if it really has to be much smaller, the lovely 2nd-Gen Shuffle (which my Significant Other managed to lose shortly after I presented one to her as a gift; she’ll inherit my iPod Photo now).

- True Gapless Playback. The iPod Photo had just one glaring flaw: any album by a group that had a thing for track-into-track segues (say, XTC, the Beatles, Pink Floyd…you get the idea) didn’t translate at all with the Photo; you’d get an abrupt track change instead of the smooth, proper transition the band and engineers intended. I know the iPod Generation kicked off the “rip/mix/burn-it-like-you-wanna” thing, but if I want to hear the damn album the way it was released, then I should be able to. In the iPod world, this possibility didn’t materialize until the 5th Gen iPod (video). Now that I have the newest Classic, I really, really appreciate this.

- The Sound. Most talk about getting good sound from an iPod is almost entirely focused on headphones, usually fairly pricey ones. But, to use a high-end audio mantra, you only get out what you put in. Sometime around the introduction of the first iPod Classic, Apple quietly made some serious engineering changes in the output section of the iPod, resulting in both a reduced noise floor and improved detail. One online review stated that the new design appeared to be ever-so-slightly less “warm” sounding than the previous design, but between the lowered noise floor and improved musical detail the new design was a solid net gain. I concur: subjectively, the Classic’s overall sound might sound a tad less “euphonic” than my iPod Photo, but I also notice better transient detail and handling of low, delicate notes with both my semi-isolating, against-the-ear Sennheiser PMX200 headphones and my Sony MDR-EX85LP in-ear ‘phones. Somehow this seems to have at least a slight effect on line output, too: playback through the living-room hi-fi (via a Griffin AirDock, also a screaming bargain at its current price) offers similar, but not quite as obvious improvements over the iPod Photo. This isn’t a case of bad versus good: this is good versus Mighty Good.

- The Classic is, as close as can be, a direct descendant of the original iPod that turned the portable digital music-player market on its ear. The enhancements it has picked up since then have made sense insomuch as they haven’t gotten much in the way of the Prime Directive, if you will: allowing the user to carry and access her/his music collection about easily, and with reasonable fidelity. No, it was never a direct replacement for a killer home ‘fi (which most people don’t possess), but more than ear-pleasing in the environs in which these devices are most-often used. (Yes, as a New Yorker, the subway comes to mind most often…particularly the F, A, C, and #2/3 lines.)

- While I do admit that the iPhone/iPod Touch interface is mad-cool and industry-leading, I still believe the Click Wheel more than holds its own in terms of overall ergonomics; as has been pointed out in a few other reviews here, it’s still the only interface you can manage one-handed, and which allows you to navigate between music tracks without looking at the unit (why isn’t THIS the iPod “Touch?”). Like the 5G iPod, you get video, which for the most part I couldn’t care less about (although I can now view the video portion of my iTunes purchase of The Traveling Wilburys Collection, which is sort of nice). The notion of watching music videos, let alone feature-length movies, on a not-even-three-inch screen, when we’re being assaulted with the idea that a 32″ screen at home is woefully inadequate, ’specially if it ain’t high-def, is a bit inconsistent.

But, this is about music, music you can take with you.

By this lone standard, the iPod Classic clearly blows everything else Apple offers into the weeds. Anything not made by Apple, IMO, hasn’t even found its way to the starting line. The interface is highly functional and sexy enough, without allowing surface to roll straight over substance.

The happy thing is that Apple offers options to fit just about anyone. If you need a single do-it-all device, and don’t care (at least at the moment) about capacity for all your fave tracks, you’ve got either the iPhone 3G or iPod Touch; if you want your device as tiny and unobtrusive as possible, you’ve got either the Shuffle or the polychromatic nano. And, finally, if, like me, you want, over all else, as much of your music at hand, wherever you are, as your balm, your salve, your relief from waiting-room Hell or airport Purgatory, the Classic is really it. And, for what it’s worth, the current (120GB) Classic wil be able to use the newest Apple earbuds with in-line remote control and microphone (they’ve got a twin-driver ‘phone “coming soon” that promises to be grand-sounding; we’ll see). If you haven’t checked out any ‘Pods since the Photo or before, this is likely the one to finally pop for.

Review by D. Porter:

Well, I bought two of these. No, don’t ask me why. Please just believe that I purchased two new 7th generation iPods – against the advice of the reviewer who obviously did some homework as to why the old units sound better, I might add. I looked at many forums and read from many people who think the new iPods, (6th generation and later,) have a poorer sound quality than their predecessors. Then I read from those folks who believe that yes, Apple changed the audio codec chip, and yes, several audiophiles have done some qualitative testing and the old units won, but nevertheless, the difference should be impossible to hear with the naked ear. Let me just assure you right now, it is not. The difference in sound quality between my wife’s 5.5 gen 80 gig iPod and my two new 120 gig units is vast. Using the same headphones and songs, downloaded from the same computer, the new iPod sounds like listening to music played inside a tin can compared to the old one. For instance, in one song a drummer rakes his hand across some chimes and on the 80 gig, the chimes are crystal, distinct, and separate from all the other things going on at the time. On the new 120 gig at the same spot, the highs are all compressed into a jumble of noise with flat, tinny, cut off sounds. The chimes sound far off and suppressed. The list of music defacement goes on. I noticed this problem across all tonal ranges. So what did I do? I opened a case with Apple and made an appointment at the nearby Apple store. Yes, I lugged in my laptop and two of the iPods. At the store I synced one of their units to the same song and we went through all three iPods, my one new unit, my one old unit, and the store unit, listening to the same 30 or so seconds of song on each iPod over and over. And over. The results were clear… much clearer than the sound from the new iPods, I’m sorry to say. At the store I also inquired about the noticeable lag when starting songs on the new unit. I was told, “It’s much more complicated software.” Obviously the ability to view the album covers has won out over quality sound. So I’m returning the two 120 gig iPods. Apple is getting them back. Good riddance. Perhaps Apple has forgotten that people buy iPods for entertainment’s sake. Music and movies. I hope this helps them to remember that people buy music playing devices to actually listen to music. Now, I’ve read from the reviewers who suggest that we who want good sound from portable music devices should just get over it. Well, I say blah! Blah on them all! I assert that Apple should be improving sound with new generations of devices. If they want my money that’s what they will have to do. I don’t believe it’s unreasonable to expect newer models of expensive electronic devices to outperform old ones. As for sound quality, the older iPod puts forth very adequate sound. Certainly it could have been improved upon, or at the very least left alone. In fact, how dare the naysayers suggest that we all settle for poor sound? That we should expect poor sound? I say my money goes to the company willing to aim for high fidelity from its music devices. That won’t be Apple for the nonce. If all you want is an expensive portable hard drive with a video screen, this is definitely the unit for you.

Buy Apple iPod classic 120 GB Black (6th Generation) [Previous Model] now for only $ 220.00!

Apple iPod classic 80 GB Silver (6th Generation) OLD MODEL

.caption { font-family: Verdana, Helvetica neue, Arial, serif; font-size: 10px; font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; } ul.indent { list-style: inside disc; text-indent: 20px; } With 80 GB of storage, iPod classic gives your music and video room to move. It also has plenty of energy (up to 40 hours of audio playback), good looks (a sleek, all-metal design), and a great personality (a brand-new interface with Cover Flow). In other words, iPod classic makes an ideal companion. Cover Flow
If a picture says a thousand words, think of what all the album art in your collection might say.

  • iPod classic puts your entire music and video collection in your pocket with 80 GB of storage
  • An enhanced interface offers a whole new way to browse and view your music and video
  • Cover Flow technology lets you use the patented Click Wheel to flip through your music by album cover
  • Beautifully designed, iPod classic features a sleek, all-metal enclosure
  • 2.5-inch display; measures 4.1 x 2.4 x 0.41 inches (H x W x D), weighs 4.9 ounces

Rating: (out of 949 reviews)

List Price: $ 249.00
Price: $ 200.99

Apple iPod classic 80 GB Silver (6th Generation) OLD MODEL Reviews

Review by Jersey Girl:

**Before you read some of the negative reviews, please consider this was BEFORE the new firmware update 1.0.3 came out so unfortunately they had unresponsive clickwheels, itunes messing up etc. Also some people simply did NOT upgrade their firmware for whatever reason but A LOT of those problems have been fixed with the new firmware so UPGRADE YOUR FIRMWARE AS SOON AS YOU GET YOUR IPOD! It will make a BIG difference!**

Ok, on to the review..I just got my 80 gb ipod classic recently with a 3 year extended service plan, immediately got itunes version 7.5 and upgraded the firmware immediately to 1.0.3 which seems to have taken care of A LOT of bugs people have been reporting. It must have because I am not getting ANY of the problems other have reported such as laggy clickwheel, itunes freezing etc. The clickwheel is VERY responsive, only a light touch is needed and scrolling through cover art was very quick! No problems whatsoever with the clickwheel. I also have had no problems copying files to itunes and transferring them to my ipod. The ipod itself is a thing of beauty, love the non scratchable surface but the back of the ipod is where you can see all the fingerprints etc so get a good cover for it. The slimness of it is very sleek and heck this ipod just looks cool. I got the ipod up and running in no time after I transferred my music over. Love the search feature as well. There is a lot of features, settings and extra’s. Heck I even like the clock.

PLEASE NOTE:TURN OFF & DON’T use the EQ (equalizer setting)if you want normal distortion free sound. I was using the EQ and wondered why a lot of my songs had distortion. I thought it was due to the bad sound everyone was talking about until I turned OFF the EQ. Upon turning the EQ off, the distortion vanished completely, the sound was just fine, pretty good in fact. It’s a shame that you have to turn off the EQ settings to get good sound. Hopefully Apple will fix this with a firmware update.

I almost got one of the itouch ipods but the very limited space is what kept me from doing so. 80 gb is plenty of space for my music, a bit of videos etc. It might not have wifi or a touch screen but it’s got tons of space for my music and that’s what counts! I love my ipod classic, can’t find much to be picky about except for the sound when EQ is enabled. It does exactly what it’s supposed to, is easy to navigate, videos look crisp/great on it and most of all it holds a crapload of music. Just remember to upgrade your firmware to the newest version, disable EQ and invest in a good pair of headphones. One of the best things about the ipod classic is that because it has so much space, I don’t have to worry about how many mp3’s I put on it. I’ve never downloaded so many mp3’s in my life! I literally put my entire collection of mp3’s on it and still have tons of space left. Overall, I rate the ipod classic 80 gb (black)…absolutely superb.

Review by Nse Ette:

Ok guys, I just picked up my silver iPod classic 160gb from the Apple store on Regent Street in London so I can give an actual review on it.

I’ve had an 80GB video iPod for a year and it’s already full, so I was really hoping Apple would make an iPod big enough for me. Presently I’ve got 110GB (and counting) of music, so this iPod is for people like me who have a large music collection, and who like to be able to take it anyplace.

The 160GB iPod is the same size as the 80gb, but costs less than the 80GB did when it first came out.

With a brushed aluminium front finish (similar to the 2 and 3G Nanos), it should be less prone to scratching, though the back is the same smudge magnet, and I don’t know how resilient the screen is. The front is curvier than that of the last 2 video iPods, with the screen slightly depressed from the rest of the casing.

Additional features are extra long battery life (40 hours for music, 7 hours for video; I’ve tested this and playing music non stop without much fast forwarding, etc, it’s about right), and cover flow (a fun way of scrolling through for music using album cover art, though it is a bit sluggish).

The new split-screen interface lists functions to the left half of the screen, and symbols (or previews of content such as cover art, videos or photos shown as a slide show) to the right as you scroll through the functions. Neat!!

During music playback, after being idle for about 80 seconds, the screen goes gray and displays a clock, and battery power. Viewing tracks in an album also gives you, at a glance, the track times. Same for video. A nice touch. To my hearing, the sound quality (without equalizers, mind you) is improved; more bass and a bit more treble. The iPod turns off in about 2 seconds, much faster than previous models.

It’s still got the other regular features; album track lyrics (new, nicer text font, and it also shows the album art), can play video and games, store photos, contacts, calendar, notes, stopwatch, and screen lock (which allows you to lock the screen with a password), and it can be used as an external hard drive. It shows up in windows explorer as an external drive. The search feature allowing one to type in album/song/artist titles (introduced in the last video iPod) is still there, but relocated to the “music” menu. I didn’t spot it at first. In fact, the menu has been reshuffled to make it better, and (under settings) one can now view number of songs, videos, photos, etc graphically just like in iTunes.

If you need loads of space for your music collection, you can’t go wrong getting this. Judging from the crowds in the store, Apple’s got another hit here. Now if only the iPod touch had this much memory…

Review by S. Lee:

I don’t know how many people actually have this and wrote the review but at least I have it. Here are my takes on it:

Good things about this device:

1. its new interface looks much better than the old generation ones. fonts are sharper, coverflow search is hip, and there are some subtle differences people will appreciate. For example, when you play iPod after certain seconds the screen goes black and it will serve as a watch. it tells you what time it is. it may not look like much, but you will appreciate it.

2. audio quality has improved and you will definitely notice the difference if you have listened to a lot of music. far less hiss on the background and the sound is just warmer.

3. enclosure is absolutely gorgeous. there is also some subtle difference that makes this iPod look far much better than the last gen iPods. plus it’s a lot thinner than last gen’s iPod as well.

now the bad things about it.

1. touch wheel response is almost unbearable. since Apple decided to manufacture touchwheels on their own it has been having very inconsistent responses. last gen iPod was too jumpy when you scroll so you would have difficulty being accurate. This iPod, on the other hand, does not respond well when you scroll. it will take you far more pressure and far more spinning to get to where you want to be.

2. there are some bugs that must be fixed too. it sorta happens randomly but sometimes you can’t control the volume, and sometimes you can’t scroll down within albums.

overall, this iPod is excellent. the top notch sound quality overcame some of the problems it had. recommended.

Review by T. Hosford:

You can read on for a detailed review. In summary, if my music collection wasn’t larger than the iPod this was replacing, I would put the iPod classic on the shelf (or maybe ebay it) and run the old one.

This iPod is the first apple iPod product I have felt was just an afterthought. I have owned the 1G shuffle, the 2G 4GB Nano, and a 4G 20GB iPod color (wife also has a 5G 30GB iPod Video). I absolutely loved all of them. All felt like polished products.

The iPod Classic feels like an afterthought that they came up with when they decided to make the iPod touch not a real iPod, but halfway between a nano & an iPod.

The iPod Classic is very underpowered, or the firmware is poorly written. Either way, you will find navigating through the menus very tedious and will start becoming annoyed. The first thing you will notice is that there is something wrong with the click wheel. It doesn’t pick up your finger movements the way the other generations of iPod did.

Apple has never been very friendly to audiobook listeners, but the current software makes it really bad. You can no longer sort your audio books by genre (or author, or even book title). All audiobook files are only accessible in a single alphabetized list. Yes, that’s files, not books. So to get to ‘State of Fear’ part 6 of 8, you need to scroll down through every file of every book you have that has a title that starts earlier in the alphabet than “S”. For me, that’s 187 files. What’s worse, is the list isn’t a normal list of files (as was in the last generation of iPod), but is double height for each file and displays a tiny picture of the book’s cover next to the file. What’s still worse is that most of the time these just show question marks and slow the scrolling process even more.

The podcast menu uses the same double height lists, as do virtually all lists. Currently you can’t turn this off, and you get to wade through your songs in this manner.

The cover flow feature is completely unusable as it is so slow and the album art isn’t populated quick enough to actually be of use.

The general navigation utilizes a 1/2 screen for the menu and 1/2 screen for artwork, cut vertically. Its only use is to look good in apple commercials. After the “wow, that’s neat” wears off, you search around for how to turn it off, but sadly, you can’t. All it does is make what you are trying to read cut off, and also slows down the iPod. You will notice between a 1 & 2 second lag time from selecting an item before the sub-menu shows up.

I would say you should buy a fifth generation if you can find one, or hold out for the next generation of the touch (when it has enough space to hold your music).

The only good thing about this iPod is that all the problems appear to be software related… however my fear is that apple won’t be working too hard to fix them as the “touch” is their baby right now. The click wheel problems might also be software related, as it seems like some of the non-response you get is the software locking up, rather than the click wheel itself not detecting your finger. I would recommend not purchasing this iPod until a SIGNIFICANT software update is released.

I will update this review for new updates to the software if there is any noticeable difference. Currently I have version 1.0.1

*Update: I have found that if you disable “view album artwork” on the settings in iTunes, this dramatically speeds up the iPod. It is a shame you need to do this, but it even makes the click wheel more responsive. You will have no artwork, at all, on the iPod, but the music and menus will function quickly.

*Apple released software version 1.0.2. I have not noticed any change in performance running the iPod without artwork. I enabled artwork to test if the patch did anything there, and I must say that the speed of the menus has improved and the coverflow is a lot more smooth (though still not very useful). However, it is still slower than the old iPods and the flaws mentioned above remain.

*Apple released software version 1.0.3. Hopefully it will address some of the above mentioned concerns.

***WARNING – I have installed software update 1.1. It has some serious issues and I would not advise installing this update. For some, it is bricking the iPod. Not for me, but there are some really weird/bad things it does and I haven’t noticed anything good that it does. The most noticeable negative change is that the iPod does not turn off correctly at the end of a playlist. I like to listen to my iPod as I fall asleep (The Classic Tales podcast is excellent, look into it), so I do an “on the go” playlist with one episode, so that after I fall asleep the episode will end and the iPod will shut off. Not so with the new update. At the end of the episode the iPod just plays what I can only describe as dead air. So, the iPod will just play this (I guess until the iPod runs out of batteries, but I usually just find it playing dead air in the morning and turn it off manually by holding the play button).

My fears about the software updates not being priority for Apple look like they are coming true. I have a sneaking feeling that they will update the iPod Touch to a full sized iPod (30GB-60GB) before the Classic is fixed. Again, buy a 5th gen if you can find one and avoid this product.

Buy Apple iPod classic 80 GB Silver (6th Generation) OLD MODEL now for only $ 200.99!

DLO HipCase Leather Folio Case for 80/120/160 GB iPod classic 6G (Black)

The HipCase for the iPod classic is a folio-style case that gives you complete body protection, a padded flip-up cover with hidden inner pocket, a leather-covered belt clip, and total iPod access–all in one sleek leather package. Clip Your iPod Classic–in Style
The HipCase’s sturdy, leather-covered belt clip ensures that your iPod classic will always be within easy reach. And with its clean lines and stylish construction, the HipCase is the perfect accessory–from a suit and tie to jeans and a T-shirt. Clipped securely to your belt or your backpack, the HipCase protects your iPod classic in

  • Leather case with front cover and soft, fabric-lined interior
  • Sleek belt clip keeps iPod classic securely at your side
  • Padded cover flips up to reveal a hidden pocket–perfect for an ID, credit cards, or cash
  • Full access to all iPod controls, click wheel, and dock connector
  • Access to iPod headset jack, even when closed; compatible with 80 GB and 160 GB iPod classic 6G

Rating: (out of 160 reviews)

List Price: $ 29.99
Price: Too low to display

DLO HipCase Leather Folio Case for 80/120/160 GB iPod classic 6G (Black) Reviews

Review by Deanokat:

My son just turned 18 and we got him an 80GB iPod for his birthday. We gave him an eVo4 iSkin case with it, but that thing was a piece of junk. It took forever to get it on. And after it was on, the iPod looked like an alien being from another planet. And my son couldn’t dock the iPod in his Luna clock radio while it was in the iSkin case. So we searched around for another case. We wanted something that would protect the iPod from every day wear and tear without going overboard. The DLO HipCase is the perfect solution (at about 1/2 the price!). The iPod fits snugly within this nice leather case. Nice and soft inside. The fold open/fold down flap has a magnetic closure to keep it secure. Easy access to the click wheel, charging port, hold button, and headphone jack. And at night when my son wants to dock the iPod in his clock radio, he can just slip it out of its case. I think the iSkin case would’ve required a jackhammer to get it out every night. Aside from being very functional, this case also hits a home run in two other areas: 1.) It’s very stylish. Very simple design, nice leather, nice belt clip. And 2.) It’s very reasonably priced. If I didn’t know how much I paid for it, after having seen the case in person and held it, I would’ve guessed it cost two or even three times more than it did. The DLO HipCase Leather Folio is the perfect companion to the iPod Classic. A classic looking case for a Classic iPod.

Review by J. Marren:

This is the best case I’ve ever had for an IPod. The fit for the classic is perfect. The quality is far better than the price would suggest. I hate having plastic over the screen–here the flip protects the screen. It would be nice if the belt clip were removable but I don’t care all that much. For an adult, this is a sleek stylish case at a great price. Highly recommended.

Review by Christian Polychroniadis:

This case it’s perfect, I have a 120 Gb Ipod and it perfectly fit in the case (Not only for 80 GB ipod), it protects your ipod and it has a magnetic cover that let you close and open your ipod conveniently, buy it !!!.

Review by Garth Erickson:

Got this case so i could take it out and put it in the dock easier than one of those rubber cases. The leather is nice and soft. It holds my ipod classic 160g perfectfly and is very secure. The only compaint is that the hole for the wheel is not the full size of the wheel, although it doesn’t stop it from being fully functional, just somthing to think about if you have big fingers.

Buy DLO HipCase Leather Folio Case for 80/120/160 GB iPod classic 6G (Black) now for only Too low to display!

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